Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Quilling Paper Storage


I recently built a new storage method for my quilling strips out of foam core. It's 27.5" wide x 10" long x 1.75" deep and fits in my Ikea shelf drawer. I like seeing and choosing from the whole range of colors at a glance.

I use scrap paper to "belt" the unruly waves so they stay orderly. To allow for different amounts of paper I ordered online, I varied the gaps between the 1/4" foam core divider walls. Notching a half moon out of the sides allows me to lift each layer up. Then I put elastic bands around each layer to keep them from doing any accidental back flips.


I used to throw all the leftover bits into a bin, but found myself literally looking for a needle in a haystack, only to find what I wanted after I cut a new strip. Now for the smaller scrap pieces, I enjoy using my binder method. It's compact and I can quickly see what scrap I can use up before pulling out a new strip. It takes some time to put them in, but it saves much more time when finding what I want.



If a finished shape isn't quite to my liking, I'll store it in a fish tackle box like this and use it up some other time.

OK, I know I'm not the only one out there who likes to organize. What's your favorite storage method?

8 comments:

  1. I'm in awe of your Quilling and hope to give it a try soon.
    When I cut a piece of Washi paper that I use for Iris Folding projects, I cut the entire sheet and store my strips with a mini binder clip at each end and store in a plastic Art Bin type container by color. I have limited storage space so the container is portable.

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    1. Thanks Jan! Binder clips are great and I tried that with my quilling strips, but they left a small indentation on the edge so I stopped storing it that way. I try not to buy/use plastic, but it can't be beat for portability and price. I do hope you'll give quilling a try - and then you'll be looking for more storage solutions!

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  2. It looks like you have really made an investment in your quilling: I have no such detailed organization with any of my projects, which is why I get so little accomplished. Great work, thanks for sharing your state of the art storage!

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    1. Hi Linda, thanks for commenting on my storage! I simply found my bin constantly overflowing and had to come up with a solution. I probably spend as much time organizing as you do hunting!

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  3. You are a very organized person! That’s a nice way of organizing quilling strips. Mine often get mixed up or lost that sometimes I end up spending much time looking for them.

    Ruby Badcoe

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    1. Thanks Ruby! I guess I get so frustrated digging through my box of bits which kept getting bigger that I had to find a solution. I do enjoy finding the exact strip quickly now.

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  4. I really like your idea about the foam core. I have made several things from the foam core and don't know why I did not think to do it for this project as well. I guess because that is why we have other friends like you to show us or jogg our memory. Just to let you know what I have made from the foam core maybe to help you or others also: I made an ink pad holder which holds several ink pads, a box for my polymer clay tools and a file box to store my embossing folders in. There is so much you can do with it. So thank you again for jogging my memory. Happy Pinning!!

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    1. Hello agrimony, thanks so much for commenting on my quilling storage post! I'm happy I was able to trigger your memory of using foam core. It's really useful isn't? I'm really quite happy with how they all lay straight and it's easy to see what color I need to pick. Happy quilling to you!

      Cecelia

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